Frequently Asked Questions

Q

Why was “The War in Ukraine: The Truth About the Russian Invasion of Ukraine” exhibit created?

A

This exhibit was created by groups representing pro-democracy Russians and Ukrainians, called Canadians For Democracy in Russia and Euromaidan Canada. The exhibit demonstrates Russia’s involvement in Ukraine, and conveys some simple messages. The only viable and lasting solution to achieving peace and stability is to help Ukraine establish a strong civil society and democratic system of government against Russian aggression. The world must continue to call for strengthening sanctions against Putin’s Russia for his responsibility in waging war in Ukraine. Putin is not a reliable, nor credible partner in fighting terrorism anywhere in the world given he is the first to use it in Ukraine. Putin’s Russia must be held accountable for the thousands of deaths (over 9,000) perpetrated on Ukrainians through this war.

Q

What is the “War in Ukraine” exhibit about and why is it important to show?

A

The “War In Ukraine” exhibit presents a comprehensive and accurate timeline of the history of the Russian invasion of Ukraine through facts and photographs. All sources have been verified and cited. The exhibit provides irrefutable evidence of Russian involvement in Ukraine, including a list of high-profile Russian-backed militants, with biographies, as well as additional information about the involvement of far-right Russian extremist radicals. Showing the exhibit raises awareness among the Canadian public, politicians and media about Putin’s aggressive war actions in Ukraine, and brings to light the aggressive nature of the Russian regime, under Putin. The exhibit will be shown in many locales in the near future.

Q

Why is it called a “Russian invasion”, if Putin and his officials continue to deny the involvement of Russian troops?

A

The exhibit clearly demonstrates proof of Russia’s involvement in the war on Ukraine. Overwhelming evidence shows that the Russian government created the conflict in eastern Ukraine (Donbas), then directly invaded by deploying Russian Armed Forces in both eastern Ukraine and Crimea. Russian Forces and Russian-backed militants continue to wage war in Ukraine today.

Q

Why is it important for Canada to continue helping Ukraine at this time?

A

Putin’s aggressive foreign policies and increasing authoritarian rule in Russia pose a serious threat to international stability. His autocratic and dictatorial rule is becoming more radical and aimed at expanding this ideology beyond Russia’s borders. After invading Georgia and Ukraine, Putin has involved himself in Syria. Under the guise of fighting ISIS terrorism, he is instead bombing Assad opposition and hitting civilian targets. Putin’s interests in the Arctic also make him a threat to Canada’s security. Ukraine took a decisive step to oppose Putin’s corrupt and authoritarian regime, and now is fighting a Russian invasion. It is important for Canada, and the rest of the world to help Ukraine in its struggle for democracy and rule of law.

Q

Why should Canadians care about the war in Ukraine? What does it have to do with Canadians?

A

Ukraine is essentially the rope in an international tug-of-war between Russia and the West. While Putin wants to exercise power and control over Ukraine by bringing it back to its post-Soviet fold, the vast majority of Ukrainian people overwhelmingly want to align with the west as a stable and prosperous democracy. Canada, like most other strong democracies all over the world, support Ukraine’s efforts to form a government that will carry out these wishes.

Q

Isn’t the Syrian war a much bigger crisis in the world today?

A

According to NATO intelligence, over 90% of Russia’s airstrikes are not targeting ISIS or Jihadist rebels, but the moderate opposition and often hits civilians. Putin’s Syrian mission is not to fight terrorism, but to promote his own interests, support fellow dictator Assad and to destabilise the region to the disadvantage of the NATO and the west. Putin’s unwillingness to cooperate with other countries in the anti-ISIS coalition, will result in unpredictable and dangerous incidents, as already witnessed with the shooting of Russian SU-24 for violating Turkish airspace. Putin’s has shown himself to be an extremely untrustworthy ally, especially given that he is known for breaking his promises and lying for his advantage.

Q

Historically, Ukraine has always had close relations with Russia. Why shouldn’t they continue to do so?

A

Russia and Ukraine are two independent states and two different legal and territorial entities. The current Russian government, which is extremely corrupt, autocratic and violent, and which has already inflicted tremendous damage to Russia’s own people and it’s political and social institutions, is trying to impose this system and influence on Ukraine by brutal force. Ukraine made decisive steps towards building a democracy, fighting corruption and integrating with Europe, but Putin is trying to derail this via stealth military invasion and a massive propaganda campaign. Russia’s current government is dangerous to both itself, as it severely harms its own citizens (murder of Boris Nemtsov) and institutions, and to its neighbours, as it pursues an aggressive and violent foreign policy, invading them and killing their citizens.

Q

The exhibit focuses on the eastern Ukraine region of Donbas, where some decided to separate in 2014. Why is Ukraine concerned about he outcome of this people in the Donbas region? How do the people of the region feel about that?

A

The exhibit focuses on the eastern Donbas region because that is where Russian aggression has been felt the most. Putin and the Russian authorities staged the conflict by sending special Russian personnel and Russian citizens to deliberately destabilize the region by organizing unrest and taking over government buildings. These actions attracted many local criminals and extreme far-right groups who exploited the situation and terrorized local citizens. This “act of separation”, carried out by unidentified armed “little green men”, did not comply with Ukrainian law regarding referenda, nor did it meet international standards. It has not been recognized by any government in the world.

Q

Crimea was once a part of Russia, and became part of Ukraine in the 1950’s. Does that mean it should automatically go back to Russia?

A

In the context of modern international relations, evolving historical boundaries do not, and never will, be a justification for invading and annexing parts of an independent country to another. For example, parts of Poland once belonged to Germany, but that does not mean that Germany now has the right to invade and annex sovereign Polish territory today. Historically, the USA was once part of Britain, but it would be outrageous to think that Britain would invade and annex US territory today. Further, it is a myth that Russian-speaking Ukrainians were oppressed, or in any way discriminated against under Ukrainian law.

Q

Is Ukraine historically part of Russia?

A

Although their histories have been intertwined, Ukraine and Russia are two separate states. By modern political standards, Ukraine is an independent sovereign state. Russia, using historical justifications, invaded the boundaries of an independent state, and that is not right. Imagine if Russia invaded sovereign Canadian territory, like the Arctic?

 

Still have questions? Please contact us.
thewarinukraine.exhibit@gmail.com